FAQ

  • What is special about Merino Wool?

    • Merino wool is unique in that it absorbs odor caused by bacteria—trapping their smell and keeping them from building up. This means you can wear Merino wool odor-resistant clothing for longer without having to worry about smelling.

  • Why is Merino Wool Famous?

    • One of the reasons that Merino wool is so popular is its warmth relative to weight. The fabric has a natural loft that traps heat very efficiently between the fibers, making it warmer than a synthetic of the same weight. But it's also good in the heat as Merino regulates your body temperature really well.

  • What animal produce Merino Wool

    • Armadillo Merino® comes from the Merino sheep. It is a natural fibre. There are over 200 breeds of sheep, and the Merino is famed for their fine, soft wool and their ability to thrive in extreme climates.

  • What is the highest quality wool?

    • The finest and softest sheep's wool is Merino which comes from the Merino sheep. It is the most popular breed of sheep used for clothing and produces the most luxurious wool, famous for its fine staples at about 20-25 microns in diameter (superfine merino can sometimes be down to 17 microns) and a soft hand feel.

  • Why is merino wool not itchy?

    • Merino wool has a very small diameter. Because of this small diameter, the fiber can bend easier and it's much more flexible. Merino wool fibers easily bend against the skin and they don't cause itching.

  • Are your products organic?

    • Wool is breathable because of its natural origin. Wool is green and recyclable: a renewable resource and biodegradable. Wool is sheep friendly: no animals are killed in the harvest of wool. Wool is the the world’s sustainable and accessible premium fibre for use in applications from high-end fashion through to healthy and safe interiors. 

  • Uruguayan Wool

    • Wool and wool products have constituted for many years the main source of export revenue in Uruguay. Sheep production in Uruguay must be considered in the context of mixed livestock production systems since there are virtually no farms engaged exclusively in the production of sheep. Most of the livestock farms are mixed, running both beef cattle and sheep. There are approximately 20.000 farms with sheep, but in most of them the income from sheep is only a minor proportion of total income. Those more dependent on sheep meat and wool income are, in general, of smaller sizes and located on less-fertile soils where more profitable activities are not possible.

    • The present distribution of sheep shows a predominance of breeds defined as “dual-purpose” in the sense that generate income from the sale of wool and sheep meat (fat lambs, surplus offspring and cast for age animals). Recent results of a national survey showed most popular breeds run by woolgrowers were: Corriedale (42%), Merino (27%), Polwarth (9%), Merilin (4%), Romney Marsh (3%) and Dohne Merino (2%).